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of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during that session as well if you're interested in hearing what it was like to be part of that process from their van -- vantage point. the other day is was reading a book called "behind the beautiful forever," which tells the story of a group of families living in a mumbai slum, and in her author's note she tries 0 explain why she chose to focus on ordinary people rather than broader policy debates or history, and she wrote something that i think summarizes what i happened to do and hope against hope getter than i ever could. she wrote, when i settle into a place, listening and watching, i don't try to fool myself that the stories of individuals are themselves arguments. i just believe that better arguments may be even better pol
: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right size, to become fully utilizeed schools and combining under-utilizeed schools which garners savings we can reinvest and focus the resources we have in one school billion as opposed to multiple, partially used billions. >>
. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will
our city beautiful. sparkling and clean and educating youth and provide the scholarships and support for them and using culture -- about the cleanliness of our neighborhoods and respecting our neighborhoods all throughout our city. we are also engaging the bright technological mindsen joining us in s f city and join the chambers in creating jobs and training for those last year, last summer, over 5,005,000 and eight jobs were created for summer for our youth, paying jobs every single one of them and this year we expect to exceed it with your help and the help of other companies here and we need to create hope in every aspect for our youth as mayor khan said they are going to inherit the city and the successes that we are pawk talking about today, they are going to also inherit failure and is we want to have less failures with their invest and investment in them and in companies like sales force zooma and at which timer are all leading the evident with the 1800 other technology companies to help us create this investor confidence that companies are leading they started to come to tra
's honoree is a teacher, and i think teachers make the world go round. and i think education is the great equalizer in our society. and as we talk about gender equality, gender equality in math and science is such a critical area. and i'm really pleased with such great honorees, but i'm focusing on an amazing, amazing teacher who began over 45 years ago at washington high school. and i think there's a lot of ego pride in our neighborhood. she is an amazing toeholder we are honoring for women's history month. her contribution is in the field of mathematics at washington high school, go back over 40 years. and she is always encouraging and challenging girls and young women to study advanced courses and to consider opportunities in majoring in math and science and going on to really apply their learning. but i think she's -- when i review the different comments about her from less experienced teachers and students, the words that come out are nurturing and supportive and just a really person that brings everyone together as well. one of the events that washington high does is the pie day or
b.s. degree in elementary education from the university of pittsburgh and after teaching children through the seta program, donna really came to san francisco. on her arrival, she discovered proposition 13 resulted in the layoff of hundreds of bay area teachers and having been inspired by the serious needs of students, she focused her efforts on helping those most affected by the layoffs. for more than 11 years she focused her career on re-settling refugees from vietnam. later she refocused her attention on management and expansion of programs serving families and the elderly populations in the tenderloin district. many of these programs that she began exist today. in 1991 she was recruited to open san francisco's first city financed shelter for homeless family and in 1995 worked with the city to obtain the first ever federal funding for subsidized child care for homeless family at holy family day home and became the executive director of that institution. i believe donna is an inspirational, compassionate extraordinary person who reflects the best of san francisco values. it is q
. if anything, our goal is of course to educate our youth; to make sure they understand that they have partners in both city government and in the community to help. those that are lucky and can survive; all of this and when they end up on the shores of san francisco, if we can find them and provide them with support and help them change their lives. and then get to the business of the criminal acts involved in exploiting our kids. we should do all of that and this trafficking. i want to thank everybody for being here today, helping celebrate this event recognizing the awareness month but also recommitting ourselves in every possible way to do what we can do to end this on a worldwide basis and to know the source businesses and individuals and groups of people organized to continue this effort and to do our best to end their activities as well. i want to make sure that i think both emily but also nancy goldberg for your interest as well not only interest but your work as a native san franciscan to do everything that you have been doing to end this too. i am privileged tod
that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictur
big changes in the public schools. our chief education correspondent rehema ellis is in detroit tonight after an all day conference as part of our education nation initiative. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. detroit is like a lot of cities struggling with budget deficits and closing schools like the one behind me. proposed shut-downs in chicago are more and bigger than any city has ever attempted all at one time. outrage intensified as word spread. 54 public schools in chicago are slated to close at the end of this school year. >> my child has been here since he's been going to school. >> it's so sad to think that they are all going to be separated. >> reporter: the city is working to address a $1 billion deficit and says the closures could save $560 million over ten years. before it can save it has to spend. $223 million to reconfigure the schools absorbing new students. >> this policy is racist, classist and we have to continue to say that our mayor who is away on a ski trip drops this information right before spring break. this is cowardly. it's the ultimate b
an index fund. they have to educate for themselves. >> that's an interesting point. most people would think the opposite. putting my money in a bank is not risky. an index fund is risky. comes down to people's fear. worried about the market. the market is volatile and it's risky. what do you do when people tell you that? >> it's the thing about fear and ignorance allowing us to dictate financial decisions. we should never allow that. we should never be scared of something you don't know about. a lot of individuals are scared of something because they have not put pun in the market. what other alternatives do you have? show me another that can give you a 13.2% return. you show me another that can give that type of return or security. what we have to do, this is what lewis has been doing for years, directly addressing and making sure you know there are other alternatives such as exchange traded funds. for $150 a share you can buy the entire s&p 500. >> all you need is a trading account to get in. this gives you exposure. >> again, you don't trust because it's high risk. there's ways to mitiga
statistically whether it's education or how many of them end up graduating from high school. all of that contributes to whether somebody is going to get a good job or not down the road and what their prospects are so takes vicious cycle and i think we as a culture, not just the government need to say marriage is important, children having a mom and dad is important and yes it makes a difference in their lives. >> that's true that we need to, you know, encourage people to get married and have kids within a marriage relationship so they can have two parents at home. that's the best structure. but the fact is it's very, very difficult for many of these women in the communities that they leave to live in that environment, and obviously the data is showing that is not an option. >> so what is -- what is something that really can be done about it? because i agree with genevieve about telling people they should get mered but nobody is listening. >> and i tell you i was a single mom, i am a single mom, and my kids were young and it took me a long time to find a partner but in the meantim
on yields. investors are racing to the safe haven of things. almost any conversation about education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me n is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty scols that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of
on and on with this lock em up mentality and people nod their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist
to re-education camps for up to four years of hard labor for even minor offenses. it's known as re-education through labor. there are believed to be more than 300 of these facilities around the country with tens of thousands of inmates. until recently, little was known about the system but now chinese are starting to speak out against conditions they call inhumane. >>> seven years ago, this woman spoke about her protest to the authorities. she wants to continue to protest the local authorities, claiming she had been driven off her land illegally. five years later, she was seized by the police and sent to a correction facility without any trial. she was sent for one year of reeducation through labor. after being released in 2012, she committed suicide. she left behind two daughters. they say their mother was driven to despair by all she went through during the year of hard labor. they told nhk that she took her life last autumn by swallowing pesticide. >> translator: my mother just wanted to set the record straight. we're sad and angry at what happened. >> reporter: the harsh conditions in th
education and with legislative and regulatory agency. we provide formal and informal advice to the city of san francisco and in support of this implementation program, they set up a process where sea members. in this regard we have established a working group to participate in the implementation development of the soft frame retrofit ordinance. this working group of structural engineers have met to discuss the aspects of the ordinance. as part of this discussion the group has developed and endorses the following statements of support for the ordinance. supports the city of county of san francisco's effort to reduce risk through a comprehensive program such as thatten visioned by the safety implementation program and -- can be effective towards risk reduction goals and we'll continue to develop technical criteria appropriate for the ordinances purpose and intent. we will also continue to support the city's implementation of the ordinance through education and guidance of engineers and other stake holders. we look forward to continue our relationship with the county and city of san franc
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet malcolm for the paris review, and she told me that when she was in college, she had not a single woman professor. and i was just shocked. even though i know that life was like that, it was kind of astonishing to me. so my first question i was going to ask our two panelists who were alive for the feminine mystique to just describe for a moment one, um, your experience when you first read the book, and it is overblown or exaggerated to say that this book changed people's lives? >> oh, i don't think there's any question. i mean, of course, it changed people's lives. it's till changing people's lives. it is passed down true the culture. and it was the greatest social revolution probably since the suffragists. and that movement
. that is probably not fair. some will get jobs bause of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more th that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. johni just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> profe
spending to balance the budget by 2023. >> the california department of education is expanding it's list of recommended reading for kindergarten through 12th grade. that includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here is nannette miranda in sacramento. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. california department of education up updated the list of books that is to prepare students for college, klutd for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award that recognizes gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we can all be accepted who we are. i think it's great to see those books recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey milk to books like older kids like transgender teens and totally joe a boy coming out. >> there is a full sexual war. >> social conservatives are appalled. they say such topics have no place on the state's official reading list. >> they are not being taught critical think
the budget by 2023. >>> the california department of education is expanding its list of recommended reading for kindergarten through twelve grade and it includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here's abc7 news capital correspondent nannette miranda in sacramento with the story. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. the california department of education just updated its list of more than 7,800 recommended books. meant to prepare students for college and the ever-changing world. included for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award which recognizes lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we are all people and we can all be accepted for who we are. i think it's great to see those books being recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age. from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey mills to books for older kids like i am jay, and totally joe, telling about a boy coming out. >> there's a full-scale war, a sexual war. >> social
will be open for service in late 2014. >> tonight the california department of education is expabding it's list of recommended reading for kindergarten through 12th grade including works dealing with sexual identity issues. >> the state has been unable to update it's reading list until this week. >> california department of education just updated it's list of more than 7800 recommended books meant to prepare students for college. included are winners of the stone wall book awards. >> it's good to teach kids we're all people and will be accepted for who we are. it's great to see books being recommended. >> from young kids books, celebrating gay rights leader harvey filk to books for older kids. and totally joe. >> there is a war, a sexual war. >> social conservatives say such topics have no place on the state official reading list. >> your children are not being taught rigorous academics they're being taught social engineering that will hurt them physically and emotionally. >> the new book titles are recommended and the state insists they're not chosen because of their lgbt themes its not based
with their employment, education or family responsibilities. so the center on criminal justice would advocate for an increased use or implementation of pretrial services at the local level and some on this panel will speak with more detail on that. >> let me ask miss dewint that you are obviously part of the bail association and the president of the organization, you have decades of experience. critics have argued that your association and other associations like it use their influence by way of lobbying to protect the groups financial interest. i'm wondering if you can respond to that and perhaps give us an idea what kind of lobbying your organization does? >> thank you. first of all let me thank jeff and the san francisco public defenders office for this 10th year of the justice submit summit. thank you and i don't have a prepared speech. i do want to address some of these misconceptions. there is a bail reform and we are part of the reform. we are proud to say that we are part of our regulatory agency with the department of insurance to reestablish the industry. but alongside of that we
health professionals to parents and educators, in an effort named at preventing more tragedies like this. >> jon: the president there reacting to the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school. one key item in his plan, the ban on assault weapons. that ended this week after harry reid dropped the ban from any legislation. so, jim, you didn't get a lot of coverage on that in the media. >> well, on cnn on thursday, you got a certain amount of oh, hand wringing, it's so terrible. the end of everything in terms of this issue. and you're struck by the contrast that news thursday was covered and the flip for the president in last year. talks about mental health parents, educators and the pl panoply of things you might do. and so adam lanza the killer there, and sort of fallen out of the picture and the things have become gone control. the at media is so focused, john holmes, right about a the lot of things, converted to islam, and in terms of what was going on with him. the only thing they want, define as justice for newtown is gun control up or down. >> jon: we'll get to you in a second, judy. r
. i learned a lot and educated myself a lot. the human beiody is just amazin. if it weren't for the blood i wouldn't be here. if it weren't for those donors i wouldn't be here. over a hundred units. >> over 300 donors. that's part of the reason you're back now. >> it is. >> what do you say? >> oh, my gosh. >> they gave you a chance at life. >> i can want wait to hug and kiss them and just look in their eyes. i have always wanted to know what their personalities are like, too. i'm serious. i pray for them and i think about them a lot. >> how big a problem is it? obviously enough people aren't donating blood. what's the shortfall? >> i don't think people are thinking about it. world blood donorer day is in june. it's this summer. so people's schedules are busy. they're not thinking about going and giving blood. it's a generational thing. my mom is part of the gallon club. my dad. their parents before. it's almost missed a generation. i think we need to talk about it more. we need to make it a family group thing. you never know when your life can change in a matter of minutes
would say that the, well, actually that's my sector of education, for example, education sector and all sorts of service sectors and of course the agriculture should be deviated. i wouldn't say that's, you know, we don't need any regulation. that's too far, but what we need is a right regulation and so far i think that what we need is more deregulation rather than regulation. >> fujimaki sees no easy road ahead for japan's economy, but he says there will be creation after destruction. what do you think is needed to prop up japan's economy now? >> unfortunately there is no way i think. i kept saying that weak yen would be very helpful to japanese economies. if the japanese government has taken easy policies, maybe japanese economy think about drastically already but unfortunately the last ten years accumulated debt increased substantially, maybe three times in the last 15 years. so they can't make a budget. so it means that it makes bankruptcy, accelerates the bankruptcy of japan i think. >> so there's no future for japan? >> no, it's -- yes -- no and yes. i mean i like to say that we ha
. >> the teachers do not teach in class. cannot pay,children so they don't learn in class. the education is like wasted time. >> this person does not work for any international organization. he is one of the many individuals who provide services to local communities. he made the decision 12 years ago. he thought he had a well-paid job in the oil industry. when he became infected with hiv and his wife died of aids, his life was turned upside down. today, the children are getting a special lesson. two women from switzerland are staying in the guest house. they have agreed to spend time with the children. and -- them is a primary school teacher. it is a chance for the youngsters to learn some english. >> i like blue. >> the school has benefited from the political changes in myanmar. until recently, they have only offer the occasional weekend class. private schools were outlawed under the military regime, but that ban has been overturned. now they want to open a proper school at a regular timetable. the building is well under way. forill have enough space 300 pupils. he is impatient about getting bu
programs through her church. [speaker not understood] received her education from oakwood college and california university where she obtained a master's degree in psychology. ms.felder started in the city as a clerk with child crisis and worked her way up to management, to the management level and is now the director of the city's integrated response system. she has demonstrated exemplary leadership, administratively and in the field. she is well loved by her staff as you can tell, and lead her staff by example, working with a team and not above them. she has a hands-on -- she's a hand on manager who doesn't just sit behind her desk, but works closely with her team. and directly with victims and their loved ones. she believes that mental health services need to be brought directly to communities. she is proactive in setting her team to neighborhoods with the greatest need for behavioral health services to engage the community through activities and to build the relationships and trust so that those who may need services and support can be more open to seek the help that they need
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
a sweep stakes model. smit: a big part is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is here for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the valuechain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sherylout now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the v
and have sort of a self-directed education that on some foundational level are really important and that's critical thinking i think the best things my own education gave me. i think it's increasingly hard to sort of live up to that ideal, just with the burdens placed on schools today, surrounding standardized testing, and standardized testing is something i have incredibly milked feelings about. i feel like we need to have a way of measuring school progresses and schools that persistently fail kids over years and generations, need to be held accountable to that. but it also makes it very hard for schools to develop and sustain vibrant art programs and music programs and to kind of have the educational offers that reach the appeal of tie versety of kids out there. i don't envy school administrators for having to figure that all out. does that answer your question? >> if you don't hey -- you don't have any further questions, thank you for the great presentation. [applause] >> in 1978, steven hess surveyed 450 journalists covering the federal government for u.s. news organizations. over 30
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
loma-prieta was an educational piece to partner with our community. and the fleet week association has invite and had there are so many of them here, i'm very proud of our neighborhood emergency response team training folks that are here today. my hat is off to you because we couldn't do it without your dead gaytion -- dedication and volunteerism. so, thank you to our nert members here today. (applause) >> and i'm so proud to continue to be partnering with our military personnel when it comes to humantarian assistance and disaster relief. i was literally in awe on wednesday on ocean beach with the landing of the lcac and also to take a look at the capabilities and the resources that we would have available to us in the event of a large-scale emergency. my hat is off to all of you with just how well you've planned, your multitude capabilities, and as secretary schultz said i'll take a note from his confidence of display. to see how you set up in an hour a field hospital to take care of patients, not run of the mill patients, but critically wounded patients. we were so impressed. i thin
's been an education process. as we started down the road i think there was an expectation all water and sewer was going to be in operation in san francisco after an ert quake. that probably is not going to happen. it's a little bit different having several blocks in your population out of water versus out of electricity or gas or cell phone service. it's a little bit different level of emergency. after an earthquake what we're designing for is to have the high level fire system more or less immediately. there may be homes, individual service connections, which could be out of water for quite some time and that's where my utility has to interface with other departments to make sure we're getting water to people through humanitarian stations, red cross, mutual aid is a huge part of this with our federal and state partners. but those hand off points after a major event and educating ourselves what we're doing and not doing is a big part of the life line process that naomi is running and it's been very, very helpful. >> thank you. and mr. angelus. >> in terms of standards, similar
12 years of educating professionals in the greater san francisco bay area and around the world we at g g u firmly believe that an educated workforce is the best way to bring that vision forward. we applaud mayor khan's efforts to workforce development opportunity opportunities for the cities and we hope to work with her to create additional opportunity we thank the mayor for her continued services in the city of oakland and the bay area now before you meet her there is going to be a short video but we want you to welcome may khan. thank you. >>> oakland has a rich hair damage it's talented and there is a few reason why artistss are gravi at a timing to oakland one it has a long history of art for many reasons certainly there is a huge rich tradition here it's a perfect artistic hub it's a place that if i were back in a band i would seriously consider located locketting my place here you can grow your audience there is a lot of new businesses sprod sprouting you mean and new cafe and is stews. and if i brought someone to oakland the highlight of the trip they would have to s
- and education. innovation along with it's partner collaboration are being reflected in the explosive growth of the tech sector for each i couldn't engineer hired by pandora or twitter a multiplier effect occurs with job openings create for eliminate oh, mow drivers bare resist at a asks and yoga instructor and is personal finances gore g u r u's and so as we have seen as multimillion dollar facilities being created on both sith of the bay and parts of the rising sports culture tour which we have an abundance of in pot of our cities education is being manifested by the strong and growing influence of our public and private universities in tandem with our expanding healthcare sector. in oakland in 2013, oakland will have three major projects under way for over $2.2 billion surpassing san franciscotion current healthcare construction. we will get this keep it moving here ... it's a little the technology that we are talking about ... there we go. okay. office space previously used by the shining fire sector is now being converted into more efficient and open collaborative space forts ice us
by the caption center wgbh educational foundation] [clicking and boinging.. >> announcer: the following is a paid program for brainetics. >> woman: can you imagine squaring a three-digit number in your head without a calculator? >> man: 483 squared. >> 2-3-3-2-8-9? >> man: awesome. >> woman: how about solving advanced equations off the top of your head like these sixth graders? >> man: go guys! >> girl: oh! >> man: yeah? >> o.k., so it's 2-6-3-1-6-9. >> man: good! >> point 6-1-5-3-8-4-6. >> man: good. >> 3-5-9-8-5-6. >> good! o.k., you're awesome! [girls squea [man laugh >> woman: these ordinary kids have learned to use their brains in extraordinary ways. with brainetics, the breakthrough math and memory learning system developed by math genius mike byster. >> brainetics teaches you every important learning tool that is not taught in schools. how to focus, how to concentrate, how to problem solve, how to memorize anything. when you have these tools and use them to your advantage, your mind becomes incredibly powerful. >> woman: these kids are seeing just how fun and cool learning can be and it's
come together and build new opportunities for housing to go in there. we could have adult education programs in there. we could have transitional opportunities for clinics. we could do a lot of things. let's not have a bunch of 52 plus buildings abandoned in our community. we do not need another eyesore. >> we're looking at the zool board voting on this on may 22nd. any chance of them turning back this decision? >> historically when they put out this list, and they put it out every year. we call it the hit list. they have carry through all the closings on the list. in the first six years there was something like 60 schools on the list. last year they were 22. they hit all 22. that being said, they've never done anything on this scale anywhere in the country. and so we're counting on a huge public outcry among people who are invested in the communities. parents, children, educators, all of us to make a stand and say don't do this in our city. don't dismantle our schools in such a scale. and we're prepared to make protests and speak out and hopefully the policymakers will change their
the polarized the geological lead as we bring to bear. what did we achieve in education or environmentalism or what's not and in that sense, mayors suggests their accessibility to us but ultimately the real question is army is not in vulnerable to influence? our mayors on the side of big money or not? as compared to what? what in the world system? my view is mayors and councilors and citizens of cities are a great place to start because cds around world remain more cosmopolitan and open and tolerant and floral and more creative than the alternative entities at the state and national level. why not make a bet on them? we bet on the nation's state for 400 years and i am not sure in the 20 first century that that is paying off? lana please democratic that on the city for a while lands see what they can do? is worth making that bet. >> turn it over to the audience. listen. i said that when i had the opportunity. when it is on the ballot by a vote for the parliament of mayors. i went on to say some of the things that could not accomplish, would not accomplish, some of the terrible obstacles the
the insurance they need or the subsidies they need to get educated. she is trying to gain sympathies here for rich preppy white house staffers that need to pay $7 for a nice meal in the cafeteria in d.c. and now they want to raise it to $10. is that what i'm getting from her? >> clayton: she says the quality of the food. if you look at the quality of the food, even lowering it it's still better than the school lunches most of our kids get to eat across this country. >> alisyn: you mean mystery meat? [yuck] >> peter: what was that pink slime they had coming out of tube. >> clayton: we used to have cheese dream take hamburger bumps the enriched flour ones break it in half and drizzle cheese ton and melt it and that was lunch. >> alisyn: that sounds delicious. the food i had in my cafeteria completely indefinable. it was just a sort of. >> clayton: jell-o. >> alisyn: gentlemen -- gelatinous. i think it was a kung pow chicken thing. let us know what the most heart breaking sequester cut you have heard is find us on twitter. are you on twitter? the neys are 49. without objection. >> the senate
? we've solved a problem in our society, how to educate the next generation. and let me tell you, this is an important matter. we economists believe that the single most important factor shaping the future of any economy in the world including the united states is the quality and the quantity of the educated trained labor force it produces. college and universities are where we do that. if we're crippling an entire generation with debts they cannot support and jobs that will not encourage them to continue in their studies we are as a nation shooting ourselves in the foot going forward. it's a demonstration of the dysfunctionality of our system. and then the question comes could we forgive the students' debts? well, it's an interesting idea. but how then do you go to the people who can't afford their credit card debts or their home debts or their mortgage debts -- they're all hurting. and the students have a special claim, i give them that. and we need those students, i understand it. but we have to go at the root of a society which allows unspeakable wealth to accumulate in the h
it features over forty venders and exhibiters, a children educational area, and 5 authorities and -- 45 authors and poets scheduled. booktv will be live from the los angeles times festival of books. checkbook tv.org for live coverage. let us now about your area. we'll post them. post them to our wall or e-mail us. for me something so right, dear, so necessary before we got in trouble as students as young people we studied. we just didn't wake up one morning and said we're going sit in. we didn't just dream one day that we're going to come to washington and go on the freedom ride or march on washington like 1963 we were going march as we did in 1965. we studied. we prepared ourself. >> intimidated so many people white people in particular by using that phrase. black power. because when they use the word or the phrase black power it made many think that black power meant destruction. blowing up the statute liberty or ground zero. destroying america. it wasn't anything about destroying america. it was about rebuilding america and having america to have a new paradigm in terms of
and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's
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